You @ Duke Connection. Balance. Fulfillment.

You@Duke is a landmark research project designed to explore the individual, interpersonal, and institutional factors that contribute to the development of healthy and fulfilling lives for students in college and beyond.

3500 Students at 4
Davidson Duke Furman JCSU
College Campuses
over 4 Years
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The Project

The You@Duke Project is a longitudinal study that aims to better understand the factors that contribute to the development of healthy and fulfilling life situations for young adults in college and beyond. Participants in the study are asked to share their experiences and perspectives on a diverse array of topics relevant to college life, including:

- social relationships
- physical and mental health
- well-being
- academics
- extracurricular activities

You@Duke is a collaborative effort between researchers in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience and researchers and student affairs staff at Duke University, Davidson College, Furman University, and Johnson C. Smith University. The You@Duke Project is funded by The Duke Endowment, a private foundation dedicated to strengthening communities in North Carolina and South Carolina by nurturing children, promoting health, educating minds, and enriching spirits. Results from the project will inform the development of campus programming designed to help students build healthy and fulfilling lives in college and beyond.

The Team

Steven R. Asher Principal Investigator asher@duke.edu

Steven R. Asher is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He did his undergraduate studies at Rutgers University in Newark and his doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Before coming to Duke, Dr. Asher was on the faculty at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He studies social competence, peer relationships, and well-being in children, adolescents, and college students. He has also done research on motivational factors that influence achievement.

Rick Hoyle Principal Investigator rhoyle@duke.edu

Rick Hoyle is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of the Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience at Duke University. He completed undergraduate studies at Appalachian State University and earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on personality and social processes implicated in goal pursuit during late adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Mark Leary Principal Investigator leary@duke.edu

Mark R. Leary is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University, where he directs the Interdisciplinary Behavioral Research Center and the graduate program in social psychology. He obtained his B.A. from West Virginia Wesleyan College and his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Florida. His research interests involve social motives and emotions, processes involved in self-focused thinking, and the relationship between personality and social behavior.

Timothy Strauman Principal Investigator tjstraum@duke.edu

Timothy Strauman is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University. He completed undergraduate studies at Duquesne University and earned his M.A. from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from the New York University. Dr. Strauman is a clinical and social psychologist with research interests in translating theories of the social-cognitive processes underlying self-regulation into treatments and preventive interventions for psychological disorders.

Molly S. Weeks Research Scientist molly.weeks@duke.edu

Molly S. Weeks is a Research Scientist in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She received her B.A. in psychology from North Carolina State University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Duke University. Dr. Weeks’s research examines the influence of social experiences on emotional well-being in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood.




Frances Lobo Associate in Research frances.lobo@duke.edu

Frances Lobo is an Associate in Research in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She graduated in May 2013 from Duke University with a B.S. degree in Neuroscience and Psychology. She is interested in studying the role self-regulatory processes play in the development, maintenance, and treatment of mental health problems, and she plans to attend graduate school in the future.

Sejal Parmar Associate in Research sejal.parmar@duke.edu

Sejal Parmar is an Associate in Research in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She graduated in May 2014 from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.A. degree in Psychology and English. She is interested in studying stereotyping and prejudice, and she plans to attend graduate school in the future.

Andrew Zeveney Research Technician II andrew.zeveney@duke.edu

Andrew Zeveney is a Research Technician in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Psychology at Lehigh University. He is interested in how people make choices around their health and related behaviors.

Ashley Hufnagle Research Technician II ashley.hufnagle@duke.edu

Ashley Hufnagle is a Research Technician in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She graduated in May 2016 from Lewis and Clark College with a B.A. degree in Psychology. She is thrilled to be working in a setting that unites her two primary passions by working at the intersection of psychological research and education. Ultimately, she hopes to pursue a graduate degree in Developmental or Educational Psychology in order to use research as the foundation for meaningful applications and to inform the design of interventions for students.




Madeleine J. George Graduate Student madeleine.george@duke.edu

Madeleine J. George is a graduate student in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She received her B.S. in Neurobiology and Psychology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2009. Her research focuses on adolescent development and how mobile technologies may be impacting adolescents' social relationships and health.

Stephanie Komoski Graduate Student stephanie.komoski@duke.edu

Stephanie Komoski is a graduate student in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke University. She received her B.S. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2011 and her M.A. in Psychology from Wake Forest University in 2014. Her research focuses on self-regulation and how it influences well-being and goal achievement.

Julie Martin Graduate Student julie.martin@duke.edu

Julie Martin is a graduate student in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Lafayette College in 2012. Her research examines how people respond to rejection experiences, and, more broadly, how the need for acceptance shapes people's emotions, thoughts and behaviors.




Larry Moneta Vice President for Student Affairs lmoneta@duke.edu

Larry Moneta is Vice President for Student Affairs at Duke University. Dr. Moneta holds adjunct faculty appointments at Duke in the Sanford School of Public Policy’s Hart Leadership Program and at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches in the Higher Education Executive Doctorate Program. He received his B.S. and Ed.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and his M.Ed. from Springfield College.

Sue Wasiolek Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Dean.Sue@duke.edu

For the past thirty-five years, Dean Sue Wasiolek has worked in the Division of Student Affairs at Duke University. Her areas of responsibility and oversight have included new student orientation, judicial affairs, residential life, parent programs, fraternity and sorority life, disability services, leadership development, student health and wellness, counseling and psychological services, mediation, and crisis response. Dean Sue has completed a Juris Doctor degree from North Carolina Central University and a Doctor of Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

Gary Glass Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming Duke University Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) gary.glass@duke.edu

Gary Glass is currently the Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming at Duke University’s Counseling and Psychological Services. Dr. Glass has a wide range of professional interests, including racial and gender identity development, cross-cultural interactions, and the psycho-social experience of individuals in historically privileged social identities. His counseling interests include working with students struggling with disordered eating, relationship issues, and the various nuances of fear that emerge during life that can hinder fulfillment and satisfaction. He received his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Memphis in 1997.

Donna Hall Director, Academic Resource Center dhall@duke.edu

Donna M. Hall is the Director of the Academic Resource Center (ARC), which provides learning services and programs to all Duke University undergraduates. She received her B.A. from Williams College in 1984 and a master’s degree in English from Duke University in 1988. Serving as a college administrator since 2000, her background in educational assessment and college student learning and development informs the Center’s practices. Currently, she and a multi-disciplinary practitioner research team in the ARC study the role of emotions and self-regulation in college science learners.

Janie Long Associate Vice Provost janie.long@duke.edu

Janie Long is Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Duke University. Before coming to Duke Dr. Long taught for seventeen years in Marriage and Family Therapy training programs at several universities including The University of Georgia and Purdue University. Dr. Long received her masters degree from Duke University and her doctorate from Virginia Tech. Her research interests include the training and supervisory experience of clinicians, social provisions in relationships, and the preparation of therapists to work with diverse patient populations.